The Three Branches of Government

Another of my grandfathers saying,

“If you want to know about the race,

Go to the horse’s mouth!”

SO!

Looking for President Bernie Sanders in all of this?

https://sachemspeaks.wordpress.com/2016/02/06/is-senator-bernie-sanders-a-con-artist/

The Three Branches of Government

Legislative (makes laws) —– Executive (carries out laws) —– Judicial (evaluates laws)

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the-three-branches-of-government-source

 

Legislative (makes laws) —– Senate—–House of Representatives

United States Senate

Republican controlled!

is a legislative cha https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Senate mber in the bicameral legislature of the United States, and together with the House of Representatives makes up the U.S. Congress.

First convened in 1789, the composition and powers of the Senate are established in Article One of the U.S. Constitution.[1] Each state is represented by two senators, regardless of population, who serve staggered six-year terms. The Senate chamber is located in the north wing of the Capitol, in Washington, D.C. The House of Representatives convenes in the south wing of the same building.

The Senate has several exclusive powers not granted to the House, including consenting to treaties as a precondition to their ratification and consenting to or confirming appointments of Cabinet secretaries, federal judges, other federal executive officials, military officers, regulatory officials, ambassadors, and other federal uniformed officers,[2][3] as well as trial of federal officials impeached by the House. The Senate is widely considered both a more deliberative[4] and more prestigious[5][6][7] body than the House of Representatives, due to its longer terms, smaller size, and statewide constituencies, which historically led to a more collegial and less partisan atmosphere.[8] The Senate is sometimes called the “world’s greatest deliberative body”, sometimes pejoratively

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Senate

United States House of Representatives

Republican controlled!

is one of the two houses of the United States Congress (a bicameral legislature) alongside the Senate.

The composition and powers of the House are established in Article One of the United States Constitution. The major power of the House is to pass federal legislation that affects the entire country, although its bills must also be passed by the Senate and further agreed to by the U.S. President before becoming law (unless both the House and Senate re-pass the legislation with a two-thirds majority in each chamber). The House has some exclusive powers: the power to initiate revenue bills,[1] to impeach officials (impeached officials are subsequently tried in the Senate),[2] and to elect the U.S. President in case there is no majority in the Electoral College.[3]

Each U.S. state is represented in the House in proportion to its population as measured in the census, but every state is entitled to at least one representative. The most populous state, California, currently has 53 representatives. On the other end of the spectrum, there are seven states with only one representative each (Alaska, Delaware, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Vermont, and Wyoming). The total number of voting representatives is fixed by law at 435.[4] In addition there are six non-voting Representatives who have a voice on the floor and a vote in committees, but no vote on the floor.

The Speaker of the House, who presides over the chamber, is elected by the members of the House, and is therefore traditionally the leader of the House Democratic Caucus or the House Republican Conference, whichever party has more voting members. The House meets in the south wing of the United States Capitol.

Executive (carries out laws) —– Vice President—– Cabinet

President

Article II of the U.S. Constitution vests the executive power of the United States in the president. The power includes execution of federal law, alongside the responsibility of appointing federal executive, diplomatic, regulatory and judicial officers, and concluding treaties with foreign powers with the advice and consent of the Senate. The president is further empowered to grant federal pardons and reprieves, and to convene and adjourn either or both houses of Congress under extraordinary circumstances.[12] The president is largely responsible for dictating the legislative agenda of the party to which the president is enrolled. The president also directs the foreign and domestic policy of the United States.[13] Since the founding of the United States, the power of the president and the federal government has grown substantially.[14]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/President_of_the_United_States

Vice president

is also president of the United States Senate.[4] In that capacity, as the Leader of the Senate, the vice president is allowed to vote in the Senate only when necessary to break a tie. While Senate customs have created supermajority rules that have diminished this constitutional tie-breaking authority, the vice president still retains the ability to influence legislation; for example, the Deficit Reduction Act of 2005 was passed in the Senate by a tie-breaking vice presidential vote.[4][5][6] Additionally, pursuant to the Twelfth Amendment, the vice president presides over the joint session of Congress when it convenes to count the vote of the Electoral College.[2]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vice_President_of_the_United_States

Cabinet of the United States

is composed of the most senior appointed officers of the executive branch of the federal government of the United States, who are generally the heads of the federal executive departments. The existence of the Cabinet dates back to the first President of the United States, George Washington, who appointed a Cabinet of four people: Secretary of State Thomas Jefferson; Secretary of the Treasury Alexander Hamilton; Secretary of War Henry Knox; and Attorney General Edmund Randolph to advise him and to assist him in carrying out his duties.

All Cabinet members are nominated by the President and then presented to the Senate for confirmation or rejection by a simple majority. If approved, they are sworn in and then begin their duties. Aside from the Attorney General, and the Postmaster General when it was a Cabinet office, they all receive the title of Secretary. Members of the Cabinet serve at the pleasure of the President; the President may dismiss or reappoint them (to other posts) at will.

Judicial (evaluates laws)—– Supreme Court—– Other Federal Courts

The Supreme Court of the United States

Republican controlled!

(colloquially known as “SCOTUS”[1]) is the highest federal court of the United States. Established pursuant to Article III of the United States Constitution in 1789, it has ultimate (and largely discretionary) appellate jurisdiction over all federal courts and over state court cases involving issues of federal law, plus original jurisdiction over a small range of cases. In the legal system of the United States, the Supreme Court is the final interpreter of federal constitutional law, although it may only act within the context of a case in which it has jurisdiction.

The Court consists of the Chief Justice of the United States and eight associate justices who are nominated by the President and confirmed by the Senate. Once appointed, justices have life tenure unless they resign, retire, take senior status, or are removed after impeachment (though no justice has ever been removed). In modern discourse, the justices are often categorized as having conservative, moderate, or liberal philosophies of law and of judicial interpretation. Each justice has one vote, and while many cases are decided unanimously, many of the highest profile cases often expose ideological beliefs that track with those philosophical or political categories. The Court meets in the United States Supreme Court Building in Washington, D.C.

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  1. Pingback: A Great ‘Wish List’ for the Country | sachemspeaks

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